Author: Lily Cichanowicz

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Marie-Louise Crona

As the owner of Okay Café in Neukölln, Marie-Louise ‘Makki’ Crona creates delicious things to share with others, pastries and home cooked meals that come directly from the heart. Born and raised in Stockholm, where going out to eat is more expensive, “I missed just hanging out at each other’s homes, so this was also a reason why I started cooking more here for other people.” The crowd favorite was always her cinnamon buns, which she baked according to traditional Swedish style, simple, rustic, and seasoned with a hint of cardamom…. Read more.

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Ruth Bartlett

Ruth Bartlett’s way of relating to food speaks volumes about how she interacts with the world around her. In fact, everything that Ruth does communicates in volumes. As a creative with a bold persona, if she works on a project, you can expect she does it big or not at all, harnessing the dynamism of life and community in each of her projects and endeavors…. Read more.

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Sandra Winkens

As a yoga instructor, Sandra Winkens’ disposition –both ethereal and stoic—gives the impression that she harbors a higher wisdom. Upon entering her apartment it quickly became apparent that her approach to eating is consciously connected to every other aspect of her life, with the aim of fostering a sense of alignment between mind, body, and spirit for optimal wellbeing. Through self-discipline in building mindful habits, she is able to achieve clarity of consciousness, which guides everything she does and brings balance to her external world. In fact, it’s difficult to tell where one aspect of her approach to lifestyle ends and the next begins as it is so holistic and all encompassing…. Read more.

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Lillie O’Brien

Long before she became the founder of London Borough of Jam, a love and respect for quality ingredients has been a running theme in Lillie O’Brien’s life. As a youth born and raised in Australia, she recalls how her mother made everything from scratch back when doing so wasn’t even trendy. This instilled in Lillie a certain value for authenticity–for doing things right–without taking shortcuts…. Read more.

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Cynthia Kambou

Growing up in an African household, Cynthia Kambou was raised on a mix of traditional plant based dishes in combination with more modern processed foods like Nutella and Maggi soup mix. “I’m one of these people who has a basic journey where when you’re young, you just eat what you parents give you because you don’t know better.” … Read more.

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Leitha Matz

For Leitha Matz, meals don’t just exist at instantaneous intervals. There is a clear current of continuity between one and the next. The story of any given ingredient extends far beyond its existence in her pantry, and this came across in the flavors, textures, and aromas evident in her cooking, an epic story that unfurls on an ongoing basis… Read more.

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Progressive Neoliberalism and the Pull of Populist Politics

In the wake of the turbulent US election, social theorist Nancy Fraser wrote that the progressive neoliberal politics of the establishment served as a major factor in ensuring the success of Donald Trump in ascending to the presidency. In her article, ‘The End of Progressive Neoliberalism,’ [1] Fraser described the way that politicians like Hillary Clinton, and her forebears, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, embodied this concept. Their platforms vociferously included progressive stances on issues like LGBTQ rights, equal pay for women, and affirmative action as a means of coaxing the left-leaning masses into support at the ballot box. Meanwhile, their neoliberal economic policies are generally overlooked or even willfully ignored despite the fact that these have far more substantive impacts on the world at large. Fraser concludes her piece by explaining that the American left’s approach to the issues facing the working populace is too obtuse in that instead of addressing their concerns, liberals dismiss them as backward or xenophobic. The result is that progressive politics become deeply intertwined with neoliberal platforms like that …

© Warren K. Leffler, U.S. News & World Report/WikiCommons

What We Can Learn from MLK’s Poor People’s Campaign

Towards the end of his life, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. shifted from the civil rights agenda for which he is remembered to a new phase in his struggle for justice, the Poor People’s Campaign. It had five demands for the federal government: the creation of ‘socially useful career jobs,’ urban development projects, an end to punitive welfare policies, the protection of farmers’ rights to unionize, and the reallocation of public funds to educational programs. To achieve these goals, King organized a protest on National Mall. At 50,000 strong, the demonstrators erected a ‘Resurrection City’ where they camped for weeks, even though King himself was assassinated before the occupation commenced. The campaign was controversial with both King’s opponents and his allies. His opponents viewed his call for ‘a radical restructuring of wealth and power’ as proof that he was a communist. Being that this proposition followed King’s public condemnation of the Vietnam War, his Democratic political allies in the White House also found the new campaign to be too radical. Fellow members of the Southern …

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On the Consumption of Current Events

Over the summer as I logged into the fourth dimensional reality that is Facebook, I noticed something I hadn’t before. As I watched my social network ride the wave from Harambe into the latest outrage about Brock Turner, I got to thinking about the point in Romeo and Juliet at which the impetuous Tybalt kills the clever and rye humored Mercutio in a duel at the height of a stifling heat wave. I began to wonder about the ways that this summer’s outrageous events functioned as a release for each of us to vent some of our own heat-induced neuroses. Fast forward through the stream of allegedly apocalyptic events to Trump’s election. It seemed that everyone with two thumbs and a blaring screen before them cared to weigh in on what happened. Most of the people on my feed took one polarized stance or another in what a more astute observer in my network likened to a Hobbesian trap. No doubt, a climactic sense of bitterness and resentment arose online between Trump’s supporters and his …